Archive for István Mészáros

(Profits + Pathogens) – People

Posted in Ecological resilience, Evolution, Revolution, Sustainable farming with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 25, 2018 by Rob Wallace

I tend to steer clear of biopolitics, what until recently have been Foucauldian investigations of the means by which human life processes are managed across regimes of knowledge and power. But the crux of sociologist Marc Aziz Michael’s more Marxian post is very much worth elaboration.

In contrast to evolutionary psychologists Steven Pinker and Matt Ridley, and the fascistic and lobster-spined self-help guru Jordan Peterson, Michael describes the extent to which capital accumulation is almost entirely a cultivated sensibility, one in conflict with humanity’s long understanding our fates are tied to the state of the ecosystem.

Capitalism is no basic instinct housed in an already dubious projection of our biologies. A system teetering on its metaphysics and modes of social reproduction alike must promote the Pinkers and Petersons, the far stupider Webers and Nietzsches of our day, to claim otherwise. Continue reading

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Why Galen Erso Left Science

Posted in Revolution with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2017 by Rob Wallace

GalenHere’s my talk at Mayday Books–“not making a profit since 1975”–on science, public health, and socialism. The talk was recorded by Don Olson of KFAI’s Northern Sun News, 90.3 FM on your Minneapolis dial.

I frame the talk within Star Wars and Rogue One, along the way touching on Lenin and Chayanov on agriculture, Clint Eastwood as hog farmer, the March for Science, explorer Alexander von Humboldt, the origins science and capitalism share, philosopher István Mészáros, actress Gabourey Sidibe on phone sex, the academic plantation, the industry of bleeding horseshoe crabs, abolitionist science, and the various relationships the left has shared with science, including during the Paris Commune.

In her follow-up, Karen Schraufnagel, Socialist Action’s vice-presidential candidate, unpacks her time as an economics academic.

We Need a Structural One Health

Posted in Ecological resilience, Influenza, Revolution, Sustainable farming with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 3, 2012 by Rob Wallace

No one ever says to you, “Lie to me.” The enemy says, You will do and believe certain things. It is your decision to falsify, in the face of his coercion. I am not sure this is what the enemy wants, or anyway the usual enemy. Only a Greater Enemy, so to speak, would want that, one with greater objectives, and a clearer idea of what the ultimate purpose of all motion is. –Philip K. Dick (1974)

Perhaps unbeknownst even to themselves, many an epidemiologist, veterinarian and wildlife biologist confounds episodic and structural crises.

The good doctors gun from outbreak to outbreak, isolating samples, sequencing genetic markers, administering prophylaxes, and, for epizooses, culling the sickest and burying the dead. To be sure, that kind of firefighting is critical. We can’t have deadly pathogens running amok now, can we?

But the oft-difficult mechanics of an intervention do not lend credence they address the cause of the outbreak. Disease isn’t synonymous with its etiological agent or the map of its victims, whether or not either is placed within a One Health context that acknowledges the functional ecologies humans, livestock and wildlife share.

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The Scientific American

Posted in Ecological resilience, Evolution, Influenza with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 18, 2011 by Rob Wallace

Science is the business right now. If the science works, the business works, and vice versa. –Craig Venter

Bird flu marinates a chicken in its own juices, a satay best avoided whatever the menu special. In such short an order better for the bistro than the barn infected birds rapidly bleed from the inside out.

What to do about this bit of bad news?

Broilers and layers are as much commodities as they are birds. As much engineering problems as living organisms. So ask research and development for a solution comes the answer.

It was, after all, by virtue of its open morphogenesis and behavioral flexibility that the chicken was first domesticated multiple times from red and grey jungle fowl distributed across South and Southeast Asia, artificially selected for the backyard, then scaled up in size and population to its factory model.

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