Archive for Book

Yellow Science Journalism

Posted in Ecological resilience, Evolution, Farming Human Pathogens book, Influenza with tags , , , , , , , on February 8, 2016 by rgwallace

Apparently there’s a liberal equivalent to Donald Trump’s Sinophobic expediency.

In a New York Times op-ed yesterday, Sonia Shah, the author of a forthcoming book on pandemics, presents a nationalistic disease ecology, characterizing avian influenza as the dirty Chinese’s fault.

As if the industrial model of production didn’t originate in the States.

As if migratory birds haven’t been transporting influenza strains across the Bering Sea for thousands of years, even as those patterns also shift in response to environmental changes global and local. Continue reading

Bookmark

Posted in Ecological resilience, Evolution, Farming Human Pathogens book, HIV, Influenza, Organic agriculture, Revolution, Sustainable farming with tags , , , , , , on February 2, 2016 by rgwallace

Book tumblrThe book rollout continues.

Here’s the Tumblr page for my new book, Big Farms Make Big Flu. It’ll include author appearances, reviews, events around the book, vids and articles, and related curiosities.

The book–essays on infectious disease, agribusiness, and the nature of science–is available for pre-order here.

Forthcoming Book

Posted in Farming Human Pathogens book, Influenza with tags , , , on January 13, 2016 by rgwallace

Big Farms Make Big FluI’m proud to announce Monthly Review Press is publishing my new book on infectious diseases, agribusiness, and the nature of science.

The book collects (and revises) many of the pieces I’ve posted here at Farming Pathogens, but in addition a number of my peer-reviewed publications and five additional essays never before published anywhere.

The book is slated for release this May and can be pre-ordered at the Monthly Review Press site.

Make It Your Book!

Posted in Ecological resilience, Evolution, Influenza, Organic agriculture, Sustainable farming with tags , , , , , on July 26, 2011 by farmingpathogens

Twenty-nine thousand hits in a little over two years. Not bad for a microblog. But it hasn’t been about the numbers (let’s hope not!). We here at ‘Farming Pathogens’ have much appreciated your thoughtful comments and questions, as well as your encouragement.

Today we are asking for a touch more.

We’ve just launched a crowdfunding campaign to raise funds for completing a book based on the blog–largely on influenza and agribusiness. We are asking for contributions through our RocketHub site (which works a lot like Kickstarter).  We are also asking that you share the site’s link through your social media: Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and–old school–your friends around the lunch table.

Continue reading

Hiatus

Posted in Farming Human Pathogens book, Influenza with tags , , on May 26, 2011 by farmingpathogens

‘Farming Pathogens’ will be taking a break while we finish up a book on many of the topics discussed here, including influenza and agribusiness.

Thank you for your support and feedback. We’ll be back soon, promise, and in all likelihood will drop a post now and again. Agriculture, disease and evolution are unlikely to enter any hibernation while we step out for a bite.

‘Farming Human Pathogens’ Now Available

Posted in Ecological resilience, Evolution, Farming Human Pathogens book, HIV, Influenza with tags on May 23, 2009 by farmingpathogens

farming-human-pathogens-book-cover3‘Farming Human Pathogens’  is now available for purchase.

The book introduces a cutting-edge formalism based on the asymptotic limit theorems of information theory to describe how punctuated shifts in mesoscale ecosystems imposed by human intervention can entrain patterns of gene expression and organismal evolution. The development is applied to several infectious diseases, including HIV and influenza.

The book is a technical book, no question about it. Its target audience includes researchers and graduate students working in computational biology and the mathematical modeling of biological processes. That said, the book describes a number of case histories, including the evolution and spread of drug resistant HIV in the United States and the emergence of bird flu in southern China, that a wider audience can understand and, we hope, appreciate.

New Book Models the Emergence of Human Pathogens

Posted in Ecological resilience, Evolution, Farming Human Pathogens book with tags , , , , , , , on February 16, 2009 by farmingpathogens

Farming Human Pathogens: Ecological Resilience and Evolutionary Process introduces a cutting-edge formalism based on the asymptotic limit theorems of information theory to describe how punctuated shifts in mesoscale ecosystems can entrain patterns of gene expression and organismal evolution. The development is applied to several infectious diseases that have evolved in response to the world as humans have made it. Many pathogens emerging from underneath epidemiological control are ‘farmed’ in the metaphorical sense, as the evolution of drug resistant HIV makes clear, but some, like avian influenza, emerge quite literally as the result of new practices in industrial farming. Effective disease control in the 21st Century must necessarily involve broad economic and social reform for reasons embedded in the basics of pathogen evolution.

The book is aimed at graduate students and researchers working in computational biology and mathematical modeling of biological processes, public health professionals and academic scientists working in public health and medical geography, and mathematically trained evolutionary biologists and ecologists, particularly those concerned with human pathogens.

Farming Human Pathogens will be released by Springer in March 2009.